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Code: WW-WW11101    Add to wishlist
Price: $44.95
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Wings of The Great War WW11101
Airco (de Havilland) DH.4 Display Model
USMC Squadron D, France, 1918

Limited Edition

1:72 Scale   Length   Width
Airco (de Havilland) DH.4   5.25"   7"

The Airco DH.4 was a British two-seat biplane day bomber of World War I. It was designed by Geoffrey de Havilland (hence "DH") for Airco, and was the first British two-seat light day-bomber to have an effective defensive armament. It first flew in August 1916 and entered service with the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) in March 1917. At the time of its entry into the war, the United States Army Air Service lacked any aircraft suitable for front line combat. It therefore procured various aircraft from the British and French, one being the DH.4. As the DH-4, it was manufactured mostly by Dayton-Wright and Fisher Body for service with the United States from 1918, the first American built DH-4 being delivered to France in May 1918, with combat operations commencing in August 1918. This stunning model is a reproduction of a D.H.4 operating with the USMC Squadron D, one of only eight Marine aerial squadrons in existence during World War I, stationed in 1918 France.

Airco (de Havilland) DH.4

Designed as a two-seat day bomber, the DH.4 was first flown in August 1916.

Copyright 2003-2017 The Flying Mule, Inc.

Wings of The Great War

The Wings of The Great War range presents affordable, ready-made resin models of WWI aircraft. Each model is crafted and painted by hand and features a unique pivoting stand that allows the model to be displayed at a variety of different attitudes.

Wings of The Great War display airplanes feature:

  • Molded resin construction with no assembly required.
  • Fixed, non-rotating propellers and wheels.
  • Poseable presention stand to display the aircraft "in flight".

Why Resin?
It's very expensive to produce die-casting molds, and manufacturers must sell a large number of models from each mold in order to recoup development costs. Some subjects are so obscure that it's difficult to sell large quantities of them. Resin-casting is a much simpler and less expensive process, and manufacturers can use it to make limited runs of models that can't be cost effectively manufactured in diecast metal. With resin-cast models, collectors can add fascinating and unusual subjects to their collections without the time and difficulty of assembling and painting a model kit.

Copyright 2003-2017 The Flying Mule, Inc.

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