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Code: WW-WW11801    Add to wishlist
Price: $34.95
Status: OCT 2017 PRE-ORDER

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Wings of The Great War WW11801
Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5a Display Model
RFC No.209 Sqn, Albert Ball, 1917

Limited Edition

1:72 Scale   Length   Width
Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5a   3.5"   4.5"


PLEASE NOTE: This item has a planned arrival date of October 2017 and is only available for PRE-ORDER at this time.
  1. Orders are not shipped until complete. If you wish to receive in-stock items prior to pre-ordered items, you must place separate orders.
  2. Arrival dates are subject to change. Consider them to be estimates as manufacturers frequently revise them.
  3. Credit Cards are not billed until time of shipment. Check or PayPal payment (not recommended) is required at time of order.

Albert Ball, VC, DSO & Two Bars, MC (14 August 1896 - 7 May 1917) was an English fighter pilot during the First World War. At the time of his death he was the United Kingdom's leading flying ace, with 44 victories, and remained its fourth-highest scorer behind Edward Mannock, James McCudden, and George McElroy. Born and raised in Nottingham, Ball joined the Sherwood Foresters at the outbreak of the First World War and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in October 1914. He transferred to the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) the following year, and gained his pilot's wings on 26 January 1916. Joining No. 13 Squadron RFC in France, he flew reconnaissance missions before being posted in May to No. 11 Squadron, a fighter unit. From then until his return to England on leave in October, he accrued many aerial victories, earning two Distinguished Service Orders and the Military Cross. He was the first ace to become a British national hero. After a period on home establishment, Ball was posted to No. 56 Squadron, which deployed to the Western Front in April 1917. He crashed to his death in a field in France on 7 May, sparking a wave of national mourning and posthumous recognition, which included the award of the Victoria Cross for his actions during his final tour of duty. The famous German flying ace Manfred von Richthofen, remarked upon hearing of Ball's death that he was "by far the best English flying man".

Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5a

Designed by H.P.Folland as an easy-to-fly fighter, The Royal Aircraft Factory's S.E.5a bi-plane was first flown in 1917. Together with the Sopwith Camel, the S.E.5 was instrumental in regaining allied air superiority. Both friend and foe recognized the S.E.5 as a formidable fighting machine. It was fast, extremely strong and easy to fly, and was the aircraft of many WWI aces. Later model S.E.5a's had Wolseley Viper 200 hp engines, which ended the engine problems of earlier designs. A Vickers gun was fired through the air screw with synchronizing gear, and a Lewis could be fired over the top wing or directly upwards.

Copyright 2003-2017 The Flying Mule, Inc.

Wings of The Great War

The Wings of The Great War range presents affordable, ready-made resin models of WWI aircraft. Each model is crafted and painted by hand and features a unique pivoting stand that allows the model to be displayed at a variety of different attitudes.

Wings of The Great War display airplanes feature:

  • Molded resin construction with no assembly required.
  • Fixed, non-rotating propellers and wheels.
  • Poseable presention stand to display the aircraft "in flight".

Why Resin?
It's very expensive to produce die-casting molds, and manufacturers must sell a large number of models from each mold in order to recoup development costs. Some subjects are so obscure that it's difficult to sell large quantities of them. Resin-casting is a much simpler and less expensive process, and manufacturers can use it to make limited runs of models that can't be cost effectively manufactured in diecast metal. With resin-cast models, collectors can add fascinating and unusual subjects to their collections without the time and difficulty of assembling and painting a model kit.

Copyright 2003-2017 The Flying Mule, Inc.

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