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Code: WW-WW12002    Add to wishlist
Price: $34.95
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Wings of The Great War WW12002
Fokker Dr.I Triplane Display Model
Luftstreitkrafte Jasta 11, Lothar von Richthofen, 1918

Limited Edition

1:72 Scale   Length   Width
Fokker Dr.I Triplane   3.25"   4"

Lothar von Richthofen transferred to the German Air Service in 1915 and was assigned to Jasta 11 on March 6, 1917. Lothar scored 24 victories in 47 days and was credited with shooting down English Ace Albert Ball on May 7, 1917. Wounded on March 13, 1918, he crash landed his Fokker DR.I after being shot down by Australian ace, Geoffrey Hughes. In the summer of 1918, Lothar returned to duty and achieved ten more victories by the end of the war. Scoring his final victory on August 12, 1918, he shot down a Sopwith Camel flown by English ace, John Summers. The following day, Lothar was seriously wounded for the third time when his Fokker D.VII was shot down over the Somme by another Sopwith Camel.

Fokker Dr.I Triplane

Designed in response to the highly maneuverable Sopwith Triplane, the Fokker Dr.I was first flown in 1917 and was one of the most successful and recognizable combat aircraft of WWI, attributing much of its fame to the German WWI ace Manfred von Richthofen the iconic "Red Baron". Light weight, small size and three wings made the aircraft highly maneuverable and deadly in the hands of an expert pilot but very unforgiving of less experienced pilots. Common for airplanes of that era, a fixed crankshaft configuration allowed the entire engine to spin with the propeller, creating strong gyroscopic forces that adversely affected the airplane's handling under power.

Copyright 2003-2017 The Flying Mule, Inc.

Wings of The Great War

The Wings of The Great War range presents affordable, ready-made resin models of WWI aircraft. Each model is crafted and painted by hand and features a unique pivoting stand that allows the model to be displayed at a variety of different attitudes.

Wings of The Great War display airplanes feature:

  • Molded resin construction with no assembly required.
  • Fixed, non-rotating propellers and wheels.
  • Poseable presention stand to display the aircraft "in flight".

Why Resin?
It's very expensive to produce die-casting molds, and manufacturers must sell a large number of models from each mold in order to recoup development costs. Some subjects are so obscure that it's difficult to sell large quantities of them. Resin-casting is a much simpler and less expensive process, and manufacturers can use it to make limited runs of models that can't be cost effectively manufactured in diecast metal. With resin-cast models, collectors can add fascinating and unusual subjects to their collections without the time and difficulty of assembling and painting a model kit.

Copyright 2003-2017 The Flying Mule, Inc.

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