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Code: AM-ACBG07    Add to wishlist
Price: $17.95
Status: SEP 2017 RE-STOCK

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Amercom Combat Vehicles ACBG07
M10 Achilles Diecast Model
British Army 21st Anti-Tank Rgt, Netherlands, 1944

1:72 Scale   Length   Width
M10 Achilles   3.75"   1.75"


PLEASE NOTE: This item has a planned arrival date of September 2017 and is only available for PRE-ORDER at this time.
  1. Orders are not shipped until complete. If you wish to receive in-stock items prior to pre-ordered items, you must place separate orders.
  2. Arrival dates are subject to change. Consider them to be estimates as manufacturers frequently revise them.
  3. Credit Cards are not billed until time of shipment. Check or PayPal payment (not recommended) is required at time of order.

In 1943 the US introduced the M10 as a SP anti-tank gun. It used the carriage of the M4 tank and combined it with the 3-inch M7 AA Gun mounted on an open top turret. Because of the weight of the gun a counter-weight had to be installed on the rear of the turret. The British took their M10's and exchanged the 3-inch gun for the larger 17-pdr that had much better stopping power against the Panther and Tigers. They added some armor to the turret and named it Achilles. The first modified tanks went into service in 1944 and by the end of WWII 1,100 of the 1,650 M10s the British received under the Lend Lease Program became Achilles'. The Guards Armoured Division was formed June 17, 1941. After almost three years of training and waiting for action they were deployed to Normandy and arrived June 26, 1944. The first real test under fire came during Operation Goodwood. From July 18 20, 1944 they fought as part of the largest tank battle the British had ever fought. After finally breaking out the 21st became part of the Falaise Pocket and eventually the liberation of Brussels. As part of Operation Market Garden in September 1944 along with American paratroopers they fought to capture the Waal bridge at Nijmegen. This bridge was one of several the Allies would use to cross the Rhine and advance rapidly into Germany. The next bridge in the string of bridges to be captured was Remagen however the reinforcements for the troops trying to capture the were delayed and this bridge wasn't taken. Because of the Allied failure to capture the Remagen bridge it meant that the northern section of the Netherlands would not be liberated before winter. This winter would go into the history books as the "Hongerwinter" (Hungerwinter") when ten of thousands would starve to death because of the lack of food and the Germans preventing supplies from reaching them. The division existed until June 12, 1945 when it was reorganized as an infantry division.

M10 Achilles

Designed to fulfill a new combined-arms doctrine that emphasized the need for infantry support and exploitation, the M10 tank destroyer first entered service in Tunisia in 1943. Called "Wolverine" by the British (a name that was never adopted by US soldiers), the M10 was lightly armored and therefore more maneuverable than a typical tank. Its powerful 3" M7 gun fired armor-piercing M79 shot, which made it an effective weapon against enemy tanks. Upon its debut it was capable of destroying most German tanks, but by 1944 the newer German Tiger and Panther proved too formidable for it, though it remained in service through the end of the war.

Copyright 2003-2017 The Flying Mule, Inc.

Amercom Combat Vehicles

The Amercom "Combat Vehicles" range presents affordable, ready made diecast models of light military vehicles in 1:72 scale. These arrive in low-cost, discardable blister type packaging.

Amercom "Combat Vehicles" diecast vehicles feature:

  • Diecast metal and plastic construction.
  • Rotating turret, elevating cannon and accurate hull.
  • Painted, fitted, non-moving tracks on detailed non-rotating wheels.
  • Realistic panel lines, antennas, access panels and surface details.

Copyright 2003-2017 The Flying Mule, Inc.

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