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Code: CG-AA38907    Add to wishlist
Price: $56.95
Status: SEP 2020 PRE-ORDER

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Corgi Aviation Archive Collector Series AA38907
Fokker D.VII Diecast Model
Luftstreitkrafte Jasta 15/JG II, Rudolf Berthold, Chery-les-Pouilly Aerodrome, France, 1918

Limited Edition

1:48 Scale   Length   Width
Fokker D.VII   5.75"   7.25"


PLEASE NOTE: This item has a planned arrival date of September 2020 and is only available for PRE-ORDER at this time.
  1. Orders are not shipped until complete. If you wish to receive in-stock items prior to pre-ordered items, you must place separate orders.
  2. Arrival dates are subject to change. Consider them to be estimates as manufacturers frequently revise them.
  3. Credit Cards are not billed until time of shipment. Check or PayPal payment (not recommended) is required at time of order.

One of the early aviators who helped to establish the importance of military aviation on the battlefield, Rudolf Berthold learnt to fly by paying for his own flying lessons whilst serving in the pre-war Imperial German Army. At the start of the Great War, he was initially sent back to his Army unit for training, but quickly transferred to the Luftstreitkräfte and an initial posting as an aerial observer. By the beginning of 1916, Berthold was at the controls of a Fokker Eindecker and his first aerial victory soon followed - by the end of the year, he would be one of Germany's first air aces, with eight victories to his name.

Serving throughout the Great War, Berthold earned the nickname 'Iron Man' due to the many serious injuries he received during combat, several of which saw him discharging himself from hospital so he could return to his unit. Incredibly, his final sixteen aerial victories were all gained flying the magnificent Fokker D.VII fighter and all whilst flying using just one hand. Injured during combat with SE5a fighters of No.56 Squadron RFC in October 1917, Berthold's right arm was shattered so severely by a bullet which ricocheted into his cockpit, that amputation was seriously considered. Although avoiding such drastic surgery, the injury would trouble Berthold for the rest of his flying career, even though he would end the war with 44 aerial victories. Serving throughout the Great War, the combat flying career of Germany's seventh most successful air ace Rudolf Berthold was interrupted by several lengthy periods of hospitalisation, having suffered some quite serious injuries in the course of executing his duties. As his victory tally continued to rise, his reputation was further enhanced by tales of his bravery and determination to return to the front line, often discharging himself from hospital before he had fully recuperated and only able to continue flying by using strong pain relief.

Celebrated as Germany's flying 'Iron Man', Berthold ended 1917 with a wound so severe that his flying days seemed to be over, but this did not stop him returning to the front line and helping to inspire his fellow pilots, who were by now battling against ever increasing numbers of Allied aircraft. The arrival of the new Fokker D.VII at the airfield saw Berthold taking a quick flight in the capable fighter, returning to remark, 'It is so responsive, I could fly it one handed!' He would go on to do just that over the coming months, using the Fokker D.VII to score a further 16 victories during 1918, bringing his total to 44. Less than two years after the war, Berthold was killed by an angry mob in Hamburg, during a period of civil unrest - his headstone inscription reads 'Honoured by his enemies, slain by his German brethren'. As sad end for one of Germany's leading Great War aces.

Fokker D.VII

Designed by Reinhold Platz to participate in Germany's first single-seat fighter competition, the D.VII prototype (V.11) was first flown in December 1917. Constructed of fabric-covered wire-braced welded steel tubing and powered by an innovative 160 horsepower engine, the D.VII's greatest strength was its maneuverability at high altitudes. D.VII aircrews were equipped with two synchronized 7.92mm machine guns, with which they achieved some remarkable kill-to-loss ratios. By the end of WWI, the Fokker D.VII was regarded as the best German fighter in service, so good, in fact, that one of the Allies' Armistice terms was that all Fokker D.VII's be surrendered.

© Copyright 2003-2020 The Flying Mule, Inc.

Corgi's 1:48 scale Fokker D.VII has select parts constructed in diecast metal, including the lower wing and fuselage, bulkhead ribs and engine access panels. The top wing and rear control surfaces are made of plastic, which allows for greater detail on the ailerons, rudder and elevators. The cylinder heads of the inline six-cylinder BMW IIIa engine feature a separately applied exhaust pipe, and the undercarriage has fine gauge wire between the landing gear and simulated vulcanized natural rolling rubber tires. Additional details include a beautifully simulated wood propeller, delicate photo etched radiator grill and a detailed pilot figure sitting behind twin Spandau machine guns.

© Copyright 2003-2020 The Flying Mule, Inc.

Corgi Aviation Archive Collector Series

The Corgi "Aviation Archive" range presents highly-detailed, ready-made diecast models of military and civilian aircraft. The vast Aviation Archive range has become the standard by which all other diecast airplane ranges are judged. Each Corgi model is based on a specific aircraft from an important historical or modern era of flight, and has been authentically detailed from original documents and archival library material. Famous airplanes and aviators from both military and commercial airline aviation are all honored.

Corgi "Aviation Archive" diecast airplanes feature:

  • Diecast metal construction with some plastic components.
  • Realistic panel lines, antennas, access panels and surface details.
  • Pad printed markings and placards that won't fade or peel like decals.
  • Interchangeable extended/retracted landing gear with rotating wheels.
  • Poseable presention stand to display the aircraft "in flight".
  • Many limited editions with numbered certificate of authenticity.
  • Detailed, hand-painted pilot and crew member figures.
  • Authentic detachable ordnance loads complete with placards.
  • Selected interchangeable features such as speed-brakes, opened canopies and access panels.
  • Selected moving parts such as gun turrets, control surfaces and swing-wings.

© Copyright 2003-2020 The Flying Mule, Inc.

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