The Flying Mule Homepage
Contact Us
Search
for
Flat $6.99 US Shipping*    Cart Empty $0.00
      US Shipping $0.00
      Total:  $0.00
Code: MP-PS5558-4    Add to wishlist
Price: $29.95
Status: In Stock
Quantity in Cart: none
Quantity:

Postage Stamp Planes PS5558-4
Douglas C-47 Skytrain Diecast Model
USAAF 438th TCG, 87th TCS, #42-92847 That's All Brother, Normandy, France, D-Day, June 6th 1944, Lead D-Day Aircraft

1:144 Scale   Length   Width
Douglas C-47 Skytrain   5.25"   8"

In order to ensure the defeat of Germany and the end of the Second World War, the Allied powers knew that they would have to launch a full scale assault against continental Europe, an undertaking fraught with potential dangers. In support of this plan, Allied aircraft began a concerted bombing campaign, targeting aircraft and munitions manufacturing plants, as well as attacking strategic targets in the intended landing areas, all designed to diminish Germany's fighting capabilities. These attacks were always carefully masked by strong diversion raids, so as not to alert the Germans to where the anticipated Allied amphibious assault would take place, making D-Day as much about deception, as it was about preparation. Finally, after months of planning, the order was given to "Go" and the invasion was on. At RAF Greenham Common in the late evening of 5th June 1944, paratroopers of the US 101st and 82nd Airborne Divisions climbed aboard hundreds of Douglas C-47 Skytrains, as they prepared to drop behind German lines in advance of the main seaborne invasion force, the spearhead of Operation Overlord. At the head of this mighty air armada and the aircraft which effectively launched D-Day, Douglas C-47A "That's All Brother" would lead a force of over 800 Skytrains over the next few hours, as she navigated through thick cloud and German defensive fire to deliver her precious cargo of brave paratroopers onto their designated drop zones in Normandy and the opening combat operations of D-Day.

Douglas C-47 Skytrain

Designed to meet an American Airlines requirement for an enlarged version of the DC-2, the DC-3 was first flown on December 17th, 1935. Capable of carrying 24 passengers at a cruising speed of 180 mph, the DC-3's speed and long range revolutionized commercial air travel in the 1930s and 40s, when it carried 90 percent of the world's air travelers. Early DC-3s used Wright R-1820 Cyclone engines, but Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp Radials were fitted to later versions; these engines had better single engine performance and allowed the DC-3 to fly at higher altitudes.

© Copyright 2003-2022 The Flying Mule, Inc.

Postage Stamp Planes

The "Postage Stamp Planes" range presents affordable, ready-made diecast models of military and civilian aircraft.

"Postage Stamp Planes" diecast airplanes feature:

  • Diecast metal construction with some plastic components.
  • Realistic panel lines, antennas, access panels and surface details.
  • Pad printed markings and placards that won't fade or peel like decals.
  • Presentation stand to display the aircraft "in flight".
  • Authentic ordnance loads.

© Copyright 2003-2022 The Flying Mule, Inc.    

Recently viewed products:
 
Help  Contact Us  Coupons  Newsletter  Facebook  Product List  Privacy  Site Map 

All Text and Images Copyright The Flying Mule, Inc.